Brown or blue? Ways to use a color identifier

By Karen Keninger
Contributing Writer

This morning while I was getting dressed, I grabbed the color identifier I keep on the dresser, and used it to quickly find the dark brown slacks I was looking for.

Mine is the Colorino Color Identifier/Light Detector, and I use it in a number of ways. By moving it around on a new piece of clothing, I can usually figure out what colors are contained in the print. It’s not foolproof, but it does give a good indication. It has a little more trouble on plaids, but works quite well on most solid-colored fabrics or stripes. Mine differentiates among shades from dark to light, but is unreliable about nuances. Whether a green is a deep blue-green or a gray-green for instance is not always clear. It’s not the best solution for matching outfits, but it is handy for general coordination.

It’s also useful for those little things, like what color is this planter anyway? Or this notebook? Or this purse? Sighted people expect you to know, and to identify objects by color. So it’s handy to be able to check.

I also use it to confirm the color of yarn for my crochet projects. It’s not very reliable if the yarn is shiny, but for standard four-ply acrylic it works very well.

I bought mine for around $150 a couple of years ago. I tried one of the much more expensive models, which also had a clock, games and I forget what else incorporated in it for around $700. It’s color identification abilities didn’t seem to be any better than the much cheaper version.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Devices and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s